Call for Proposals: Yale Food Systems Symposium

People in food movements around the world envision a future where our food systems restore degraded ecosystems, mitigate and adapt to climate change, improve community health, and facilitate more equitable economic exchange. To realize this ambitious vision we must encourage and support novel, collaborative, and holistic problem-solving approaches. We want to bring a diverse group of people and approaches together at this Food Systems Symposium such as those in the public health community who seek to increase access to fresh vegetables in urban centers; land conservationists who wish to preserve farmland; legal scholars who identify avenues of policy change; and immigration reformers who advocate for farm workers.

This year’s conference seeks to foster new alliances that will encourage crosscutting conversations, innovative thinking, and actionable strategies. Eaters across the nation struggle to find wholesome food choices that nourish their bodies without endangering important environmental and social resources. A true coalition will bring expertise across disciplines to creatively solve the otherwise intractable problems of food security and access, social justice, public health, environmental stewardship, and safety. These alliances and the common goal of an improved food system will serve as the guiding focus for the 2015 Yale Food Systems Symposium.

Call for Proposals:

The Yale Food Systems Symposium will bring diverse scholars and practitioners to work together in action-oriented sessions that address the complex ecological and socio-economic dynamics of food production, consumption, climate change, and urbanization. We seek a diversity of proposal formats: panels, working groups, roundtables, and papers. We welcome perspectives from the natural and social sciences, from applied disciplines, and from community practitioners. We especially encourage self-organized group sessions and presentations that bring scholars and practitioners together.

Submissions topic areas include, but are not limited to:
• The human and ecological implications of different food systems
• Food law, policy, and regulation: opportunities for change
• The right to food, food justice, and food sovereignty movements
• Climate change and environmental stewardship
• Politics, policies, and governance across scales
• Food marketing and communication
• Agricultural biodiversity and issues of genetic property rights
• Sustainable intensification and multi-functional agriculture
• Public and market-based approaches to regulating the food system
• Industrial ecology approaches to food systems analysis
• Research methods, participatory practice, and frameworks for collaboration
• Urbanization, land use change, and food systems planning
Abstract Submissions:

Deadline for submission is May 31st, 2015. Abstracts & Workshop Proposals should be 200-300 words and include a title and keywords. Please submit online using our abstract submission form. Accepted proposals will be notified by August 1st, 2015.

Please see the conference website, www.yalefoodsymposium.org for more information.

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Farm to School “Tying it All Together and Digging in” webinar

Reminder about tomorrow’s Farm to School “Tying it All Together and Digging in” webinar starting at 2:00 Eastern. Presenters this week will be Deborah Kane, the National Director of the USDA’s Farm to School Program and Steve Marinelli, the Food Service Director from Milton Town Vermont.

Attendee Link: https://www.livemeeting.com/cc/usda/join?id=R4WF9Q&role=attend
Call-in Number: 888-566-1192
Passcode: 5894178

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Imports make up a growing share of U.S. fresh vegetable supplies

Since 2010, approximately 25 percent of the fresh vegetable supply utilized in the United States has been imported each year. The value of fresh vegetable imports exceeded exports by almost $4.3 billion in 2014. The three largest crops, in terms of production, were onions, head lettuce, and tomatoes, which combined accounted for 40 percent of the total production. Production volume increased during this period for nearly half of the listed commodities—onions, tomatoes, carrots, cabbage,celery, leaf lettuce, onions, peppers, and pumpkins. In contrast, production output for fresh-market sweet corn, cucumbers, snap beans, head and romaine lettuce among others decreased as area harvested declined. See more here.

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News You Can Use

Farm-to-shelter effort nourishes homeless families: At Jane Addams Place in West Philadelphia, Food Trust leads a nutrition and preparation training session for the shelter’s kitchen staff. Shelter residents have meals from a massive refrigerator with foods like white asparagus, eggplant, arugula, cabbage, fresh herbs, and carrots in exotic purples and yellows. Also, 67% of the food the Feeding America network distributes annually is classified as Foods to Encourage. This includes more than 800 million pounds of produce.

Food Companies Fear Bird Flu May Cause Egg Shortages:  Roughly 87 percent of the birds stricken with the disease are laying hens, according to the Department of Agriculture, and many of the eggs they lay are turned into ingredients used by food businesses in things like scrambled egg patties and baked goods. Places like McDonald’s and Panera are being affected, read more here.

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REMINDER: Mississippi Food Policy Council Stakeholder Survey

The Mississippi Food Policy Council (MFPC) is reviewing its history and organizational structure, monitoring the food system in Mississippi, identifying a variety of key stakeholders and resources, and analyzing a collection of information to better inform its short- and long-range plans. As part of this planning period, the Board of Directors of the MFPC is defining its focus and direction to advance its mission. We would appreciate your willingness to assist us with this process. With planning for the future of MFPC in mind, the Board of Directors is seeking your input via the following survey.

Completing the survey should only take about 10-15 minutes of your time. All responses are anonymous and will be kept private and confidential. No individual responses will be shared in any report, presentation, or publication.

SURVEY LINK: https://usmuw.co1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_7POOxid0TVn4RLL

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Marketing Healthy Food in Schools

Through a special partnership with The Food Trust, located in Philadelphia, the Marketing Healthy Foods in Wisconsin K-12 Schools guide was developed. This is a comprehensive resource on conventional and innovative marketing practices to support the consumption of healthy foods and farm to school programs. The guide also includes the Healthy Food and Farm to School Marketing Self Assessment to help school districts and farm to school programs determine areas of success and improvement. These documents provide a one-stop shop for all of your cafeteria, school, district and community promotions of healthy foods in the school environment.

More information here: http://www.cias.wisc.edu/marketing-healthy-food-in-wisconsin-schools/

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Save the Date: MFPC Quarterly General Membership Meeting- JULY 17, 2015

Please plan to attend the Mississippi Food Policy Council’s General Membership Meeting July 17th, 2015!

When: Friday, July 17th, 2015

Where: Mississippi State University CAVS Extension Center
153 Mississippi Parkway Canton, MS 39046

Time: 11:00 a. m. – 2:00 p.m.

(lunch will be provided — please plan to make a $5-$10 donation to MFPC to pay for your meal)

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